Tag Archives: elsipogtog

For Our Nations to Live, Capitalism Must Die

SWN-Decol

By , Voices Rising (Indigenous Nationhood Movement)

There is a significant and to my mind problematic limitation that is increasingly being placed on Indigenous efforts to defend our rights and our lands. This constraint involves the type of tactics that are being represented as morally legitimate in our efforts to defend our land and rights as Indigenous peoples on the one hand, and those which are viewed at as morally illegitimate because of their disruptive and extra-legal character on the other.

With respect to those approaches deemed “legitimate” in defending our rights, emphasis is often placed on formal “negotiations” – usually carried out between “official” Aboriginal leadership (usually men) and representatives of the Crown (also usually men) – and if need be coupled with largely symbolic acts of peaceful, non-disruptive protest that must abide by Canada’s “rule of law.”

Then there are those approaches increasingly deemed “illegitimate.” These include but are not limited to forms of protest and direct action that seek to influence power through less mediated and sometimes more disruptive measures, like the slowing of traffic for the purpose of leafleting and solidarity-building, temporarily blocking access to Indigenous territories with the aim of impeding the exploitation of First Nations’ land and resources, or in rarer cases still, the re-occupation of a portion of Indigenous land (rural or urban) through the establishment of reclamation sites that also serve to disrupt, if not entirely block, access to Indigenous territories by state and capital for prolonged periods of time.

Regardless of their diversity and specificity, however, most of these activities tend to get branded in the media in a wholly negative manner: as reactionary, threatening, and disruptive.

Blockades and beyond

What the recent actions of the Mi’kmaq land and water defenders at Elsipogtog demonstrate is that direct actions in the form of Indigenous blockades are both a negation and an affirmation. They are a crucial act of negation insofar as they seek to impede or block the flow of resources currently being transported from oil and gas fields, refineries, lumber mills, mining operations, and hydro-electric facilities located on the dispossessed lands of Indigenous nations to international markets. These forms of direct action, in other words, seek to negatively impact the economic infrastructure that is core to the colonial accumulation of capital in settler political economies like Canada’s. Blocking access to this critical infrastructure has historically been quite effective in forging short-term gains for Indigenous communities. Over the last couple of decades, however, state and corporate powers have also become quite skilled at recuperating the losses incurred as a result of Indigenous peoples’ resistance by drawing our leaders off the land and into negotiations where the terms are always set by and in the interests of settler capital.

What tends to get ignored by many self-styled pundits is that these actions are also an affirmative gesture of Indigenous resurgence insofar as they embody an enactment of Indigenous law and the obligations such laws place on Indigenous peoples to uphold the relations of reciprocity that shape our engagements with the human and non-human world – the land. The question I want to explore here, albeit very briefly, is this: how might we begin to scale-up these often localized, resurgent land-based direct actions to produce a transformation in the colonial economy more generally? Said slightly differently, how might we move beyond a resurgent Indigenous politics that seeks to inhibit the destructive effects of capital to one that strives to create Indigenous alternatives to it?

Rebuilding our nations

In her recent interview with Naomi Klein, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson hints at what such an alternative or alternatives might entail for Indigenous nations. “People within the Idle No More movement who are talking about Indigenous nationhood are talking about a massive transformation, a massive decolonization”; they are calling for a “resurgence of Indigenous political thought” that is “land-based and very much tied to that intimate and close relationship to the land, which to me means a revitalization of sustainable local Indigenous economies.”

Without such a massive transformation in the political economy of contemporary settler-colonialism, any efforts to rebuild our nations will remain parasitic on capitalism, and thus on the perpetual exploitation of our lands and labour. Consider, for example, an approach to resurgence that would see Indigenous people begin to reconnect with their lands and land-based practices on either an individual or small-scale collective basis. This could take the form of “walking the land” in an effort to re-familiarize ourselves with the landscapes and places that give our histories, languages, and cultures shape and content; to revitalizing and engaging in land-based harvesting practices like hunting, fishing, and gathering, and/or cultural production activities like hide-tanning and carving, all of which also serve to assert our sovereign presence on our territories in ways that can be profoundly educational and empowering; to the re-occupation of sacred places for the purposes of relearning and practicing our ceremonial activities.

Although all of these place-based practices are crucial to our well-being and offer profound insights into life-ways that provide frameworks for thinking about alternatives to an economy predicated on the perpetual exploitation of the human and non-human world, at the micro-political level that these practices tend to operate they still require that we have access to a mode of subsistence detached from the practices themselves. In other words, they require that we have access to a very specific form of work – which, in our present economy depends on the expropriation of our labour and the theft of our time for the profit of others – in order to generate the cash required to spend this regenerative time on the land.

A similar problem informs self-determination efforts that seek to ameliorate our poverty and economic dependency through resource revenue sharing, more comprehensive impact benefit agreements, and affirmative action employment strategies negotiated through the state and with industries tearing-up Indigenous territories. Even though the capital generated by such an approach could, in theory, be spent subsidizing the revitalization of certain cultural traditions and practices, in the end they would still remain dependent on a predatory economy that is entirely at odds with the deep reciprocity that forms the cultural core of many Indigenous peoples’ relationships with land.

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No Thanks No Giving: Mi’kmaq Call for Actions Oct. 18th #Indigenize

Women Drumming for the Water

Women Drumming for the Water

Warrior Society Call to Support Elsipogtog Seizure of Fracking Equipment 

From Reclaim Turtle Island:

October 12th, 2013
Contact: Suzanne Patles 506 523 3885

“Rexton, NB” unceded Mi’kmaqi – On “Colombus Day”, a day which celebrates 521 years of genocide and oppression of Indigenous peoples, the Mi’kmaq Warrior Society has released the following video call for support. Suzane Patles, an Ilnu woman and member of the Mi’kmaq Warrior Society calls for physical support at the blockade, solidarity actions across Turtle Island on Oct. 18th and a flooding of Kanadian official representatives’ phone and mail lines. The October 18th Day of Action is a response in protest to the court injunction that SWN is looking to serve against the encampment. Organize an action in your community, use #INDIGENIZE and send us a write up with photos to post online: reclaimturtleisland [at] gmail [dot] com.

The compound, where SWN has over hundreds of thousands of dollars in equipment, has been shut down and their equipment seized by local Indigenous peoples. Patles is among many Wabanaki Confederacy peoples asserting their inherent and treaty rights and titles over their territories at an active road blockade since Sept 28th. The HWY 134 blockade is preventing SWN equipment from illegally excavating Mi’kmaq territory and conducting seismic testing in order to begin the process of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, on unceded native lands.

The road blockade has been estimated to cost SWN over $60, 000 a day. Due to the recognition of Indigenous inherent and treaty rights and title, the RCMP have been hesitant to interfere with the blockade though not without conflict. The blockade site has the support of Wabanaki Confederacy traditional governance, and widespread community support amongst Indigenous and settler groups. Flood colonial government mail and phone systems with statements of support for the blockade including the demands of the Mi’kmaq Warrior Society. The Warrior Society has issued the following demands to New Brunswick Premier Alward:

  1. Produce all Bills of Sales, Sold, Ceded, Granted and Extinguished Lands for New Brunswick.
  2. Produce documents proving Cabot’s Doctrine of Discovery.
  3. Produce the Treaty of Peace and Friendship 1686.
  4. Produce Treaty of Fort Howe 1768.
  5. Produce consents for Loyalists to land in Nova Scotia/New Brunswick.
  6. Produce records of Townships created and consents by Chiefs to allow this.
  7. Produce agreements or consents by all New Brunswick Chiefs who agreed to Confereration of 1867.
  8. Produce evidence of consents to The Indian Act by all Native Tribes.
  9. Produce records of Trust Funds.
  10. Produce agreements for 4% of all mineral shares of finished products in Canada, except coal.
  11. Produce all correspondence letters pertaining to Numbered Treaties (Promises).
  12. Produce all documents creating border divisions, that divide the Wabanaki confederacy.
  13. Produce the Orders from the Lords of Trade to the Governor of the Colonies.